Celebrity Plastic Surgery Questions

"I wish I was braver. But I am what I am," the actress and activist says in new HBO documentary all about her life.

Jane Fonda is happy to look unusually young at the age of 80, but she's not particularly proud of why.

The 80-year-old actress tells the camera in her new HBO documentary, "Jane Fonda in Five Acts," that she got plastic surgery because she "got tired of looking tired," yet wishes she could have been more accepting of her natural appearance.

"On one level, I hate the fact that I’ve had the need to alter myself physically to feel that I’m okay," she says in the doc, according to People. "I wish I wasn’t like that. I love older faces. I love lived-in faces. I loved Vanessa Redgrave’s face."

"I wish I was braver. But I am what I am," she added in the film that premieres Monday.

Her plastic surgery made headlines a year ago when she appeared offended that "Today" host Megyn Kelly would dare ask her about it.

"We really want to talk about that now?" Fonda asked Kelly, and went on to tell Variety she was "stunned" by the question she considered "so inappropriate."

"It showed that she’s not that good an interviewer," Fonda said.

The war of words escalated when Kelly hit back on her own show, arguing the Oscar-winning actress is in no position to identifty "what is or is not appropriate," due to her controversial past as an anti-Vietnam War activist.

"Look at her treatment of our military during the Vietnam war. Many of our veterans still call her 'Hanoi Jane' thanks to her radio broadcasts, which attempted to shame American troops," Kelly said on the air. "She posed on an anti-aircraft gun used to shoot down our pilots. She called our POW's 'hypocrites and liars' and referred to their torture as understandable. Even she had to apologize years later for that gun picture, but not for the rest of it."

Fonda said Wednesday night on "The Late Show with Stephen Colbert" that the picture Kelly was referring to is one of her biggest regrets in life, and explained she sparked all of that backlash accidentally during her 1972 trip to Hanoi.

"I sat on an anti-aircraft gun in North Vietnam. I wasn't even thinking what I was doing," she said. "And photographs were taken and that image went out, and the image makes it seem like I was against our soldiers, which was never the case."

"But that image is there, and I will go to my grave regretting that, and I knew right away that was wrong," she said, but added she does not "regret going to North Vietnam."

Although the picture made her a traitor in the eyes of many Americans and politicians, she's also credited for exposing the government's secret bombing of the country's dike system. "I'm proud of that, because I think it saved a lot of lives," she told Colbert.

Fonda also became famous for her popular instructional exercise videos, which started in 1982 with "Jane Fonda's Original Workout." She surprised Colbert with this fun fact: She only produced those to raise money for her activist organization, The Campaign for Economic Democracy.

"California's huge, it took a lot of money to have this organization, which did absolutely great things," she said. "And it was during a recession and I had to figure out, I gotta start a business that can make money for the organization, and it was the workout. And all of the money for the workout went to the Campaign for Economic Democracy."

Watch that entire interview below:

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