Ron Goldman's Sister Revisits Night of Murder 25 Years On
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O.J. Simpson Trial -- Then & Now

"He put himself in harm's way to protect somebody else. He didn't run."

Wednesday marks the 25th anniversary of Ron Goldman's brutal murder alongside Nicole Brown.

And his little sister Kim, who usually marks the date in silence, spoke out for the first time as she prepares to launch a podcast revisiting the crime, which O.J. Simpson was accused but ultimately cleared of.

"I usually reserve the peace and quiet of the day to myself," she told ABC News. "This is the year of confronting."

The 25-year-old waiter was simply returning a pair of glasses left behind at a restaurant by his friend Nicole on the night of June 12, 1994, which ended up costing him his life.

"He put himself in harm's way to protect somebody else," said Kim. "His last act of his life really showed you exactly who he was — his dedication and his commitment to his friends and the people that he loved and cared about. Even Nicole, for all we know who was an acquaintance. He didn't run."

After being cleared of the murders in a year-long criminal trial, the "Naked Gun" star was subsequently found legally responsible for the deaths in a civil case, and ordered to pay a $33.5million settlement, most of which remains unpaid.

In an interview with AP on Monday, O.J. described how "life is fine" in Las Vegas, where he enjoys a round of golf every day.

But for Kim, the pain remains. "Your body just remembers, it absorbs the trauma and no matter what you try to do, it stays with you," she said.

The crime victims advocate, who was just 22 when she lost her brother, laments how he'll never get to meet his now 15-year-old nephew.

"He knows that my brother died a hero. He knows that my brother was my best friend," Kim said of her son. "And I share as many stories of him as I can."

To mark the anniversary, Kim is launching a podcast called "Confronting: O.J. Simpson." in which she interviews key figures from the case, including prosecutor Marcia Clark, and Simpson's house guest, Kato Kaelin.

Kaelin was a witness for the prosecution in the trial; although he testified he could not account for Simpson's whereabouts on the night of the killings, Clark took the unusual step of declaring him a hostile witness.

On the podcast, he recalls a conversation he had with O.J. after the murders: "O.J. pulled me into the kitchen by himself and said, 'You know I was here with you.' And I said, 'No, I don't,'" Kaelin recalled. "I was like, 'Is he trying to use me for something I think he could've done?'"

Kim said that while the case has obviously been extensively covered, there's also been "a lot of missed opportunities, I think, to ask questions that go a little bit beyond the more obvious."

"For me to be able to sit down with people I've had such a profound relationship with, or have been connected to for so long, seems like a great way to go a little bit deeper," she added. "I'm proud of how far I've come and my dad has come. I'm proud of the growth and resiliency and the courage."

The ten-episode podcast "Confronting: O.J. Simpson" launches on Wednesday.

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