Prosecutors Want Felicity Huffman to Serve Only One Month in Prison
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Initially, prosecutors recommended Huffman serve 4-10 months in prison after she pled guilty to mail fraud and honest services fraud in May.

Felicity Huffman will likely serve a short sentence and face a small fine for her involvement in the college admissions scandal.

The U.S. Attorney has recommended, in documents filed Friday, the actress be sentenced to one month in federal prison, a 12 month probationary period, and be fined $20,000. The judge presiding over the case, however, will have the final say in sentencing.

Initially, prosecutors recommended Huffman serve 4-10 months in prison after she pled guilty to mail fraud and honest services fraud in May.

Of the decision to push for prison time, feds wrote: "Some period of incarceration is the only meaningful sanction for these crimes. Not because the defendants' relative wealth has generated public resentment, but because jail is a particularly meaningful response to this kind of offense. For wrongdoing that is predicated on wealth and rationalized by a sense of privilege, incarceration is the only leveler: in prison everyone is treated the same, dressed the same, and intermingle regardless of affluence, position or fame."

While the sentencing recommendation was relatively light, feds were adamant about the severity of the actress' crime: "Huffman's conduct was deliberate and manifestly criminal: it was wrong, she knew it was wrong, and she actively participated in manipulating her daughter's guidance counselor, the testing services and the schools to which her daughter applied."

"Her efforts weren't driven by need or desperation, by a sense of entitlement, or at least moral cluelessness, facilitated by wealth and insularity," prosecutors continued in the docs. "Millions of parents send their kids to college every year. All of them care as much as she does about the children's fortunes. But they don't buy fake SAT scores and joke about ("Ruh ro!") along the way."

The "Ruh ro" was in reference to an email Huffman sent to mastermind Rick Singer.

The actress admitted in May to paying Singer $15,000 to correct her daughter's SAT scores, one of his "side door" options for sneaking offspring of affluent parents into colleges.

50 people have been charged in the Varsity Blues scam that rocked the nation earlier this year.

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